The legend man, Dick Dale who was a great player of the distinctive high-speed guitar riff at the beginning of Pulp Fiction, has died at 81 years old. The American musician took his last breath on Saturday night, told his former bassist Sam Bolle.

Dick Dale became known in the world as the master of Surf Guitar. His loud power-chord instrumentals make him famous through his songs as 1961’s Let’s Go Trippin and Misirlou. The concluding song became famous after being used as part of the initial scene in Quentin Tarantino’s 1994 classic Pulp Fiction.

It starts after the character of  Tim Roth lifted in the dinner to declare his armed robbery and carries on over the initial credit.

Dick Dale, who was born as Richard Monsur, revamped the track from a Middle Eastern folk song which he heard played by his parents while he was a child.

Rolling Stone magazine claimed in Encyclopedia of Rock and Roll that “ Dale pioneered a musical genre that Beach Boy Brian Wilson and others would later bring to fruition”. An avid surfer, Dick Dale made a fan base in the late 1950s in Los Angeles with regular visibilities at Newport Beach’s Rendezvous Ballroom.

The Boston based guitarist told his musical style was a mix of the sounds of slamming ocean waves and melodies inspired by originating music. The legend guitar player Dick Dale was left handed and began playing the right-hand guitar upside down and reared because he could not afford a custom model.

All that altered while he met traditional guitar maker Leo Fender, who offered to help to acquire Dale a left-handed model if he checked some guitars and amps.

Dick Dale told in a 1997 interview, “ I became Leo’s personal guinea pig”. He added, “ Anything that came out of the Fender company, I played.”

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